Australian Marine Parks

Recreational fishing is allowed in 97 per cent of Commonwealth waters within 100 km of the coast. Australian Marine Parks set out where you can fish.

Recreational fishing is also allowed in 82 per cent of key Coral Sea reefs.

Where am I allowed to fish?

Recreational fishing is allowed in all zones in Australian Marine Parks, except Sanctuary Zones and National Park Zones, which are “no-take”.

A permit is required to fish recreationally in the Recreational Use Zone at Elizabeth Reef (Lord Howe Island).

Information about where you can recreationally fish in Australian Marine Parks is available on these mobile phone apps:

Parks Australia is working with other partners to increase the number of mobile phone applications that contain information to help recreational fishers understand where they can fish.

For further information about the zones and rules in each marine park, check the factsheets on each network.

When you are in a zone where fishing isn’t allowed, you’ll need to stow and secure your fishing gear.

Do I need an approval?

You don’t need a permit to fish recreationally in Australian Marine Parks, however you do need to comply with the relevant state and territory recreational fishing rules and regulations, including species, bag and size limits, seasonal closures, gear restrictions and licence requirements.

A permit is required to fish recreationally in the Recreational Use Zone at Elizabeth Reef (Lord Howe Island).

You can find the recreational fishing rules for the states and territories on their websites:

Where am I allowed to anchor?

Recreational fishers can anchor in Australian Marine Parks.

However, there may be some places where anchoring is not allowed to protect important habitats or where research is being conducted.

How can I be involved in marine park management?

We need your help to manage our marine parks.

This means working together to better understand and protect our marine parks. This may include installing moorings, conducting community science, and monitoring and cleaning up marine debris.

Network advisory committees are one way to be involved in marine park management, but there may be others.

We welcome your ideas on how you want to be involved.

 

Apply for a permit